B2R Scholars Give Back

March 22, 2013  |  
News

One of the five aspects of the B2R Scholar’s curriculum and schedule is community service. These service projects are instrumental because they teach the value of serving and instill in the Scholars a servant leader mentality. Because our Scholars have been the recipients of service from others, we feel it is important to create a passion in them to also give back to their community.  The projects are student-initiated and organized to meet a community need that the student is passionate about. The students each serve 6-10 hours a month, if not more, on their given project.  We encourage students to choose projects that will make a sustainable difference in the community and leave a lasting impact on the people they are serving.

Our Scholars have chosen a wide variety of service projects around the community.  Several students have formed a group to volunteer at SOS Village, an orphanage in Kigali, where they teach the children a variety of things such as culture and tradition, English language training, and sports/game activities. Another student-led project includes Scholars tutoring other high school students at Ubaka Rwanda, a home for former street boys.  One Scholar has formerly been a competitive swimmer, something that is not common in Rwanda as drowning accidents take the lives of many people each year.  He is passionate about this cause and has organized a project to teach swimming lessons to children in a local community.  Two other students are enthusiastic about technology development and sharing resources with others, so they have created a website to share educational and English language resources with other students around Rwanda.  Other projects include: volunteering number of other orphanages, promoting a reading culture by working with the Public Library in Kigali to organize a reading hour for children, and other sports-related service projects.  Our Scholars report that being able to give back to their community and make a difference in fellow Rwandans’ lives who are less fortunate has been one of the best parts of the program.  They have learned that it is also their responsibility and privilege to serve their own people with the talents and gifts they have been given.